Numbers are Ruining Sports

Wait, no, they aren’t. At least, not in the way a lot of purists are saying. If numbers are ruining in sports in any way, it’s because some people think you should ignore them completely and focus on the game itself, and some others that think that, because numbers don’t lie, you should never deviate from what they tell you. And like any highly contentious subject, you can’t expect to convert most of those fundamentally entrenched on either side.

The truth is, not surprisingly, that both qualitative and quantitative data are essential. Continue reading

Facebook is Taking Over Our Lives

Before you ask, no, I’m not going to quit Facebook. As I’ll point out shortly, that wouldn’t fix this problem.

Lots of people spend way too much time on Facebook. For better and for worse, it’s the most popular social network on the internet, and the #2 most popular website overall (as of May 10th, 2011), behind only Google. While I won’t bother to find sources for my conjecture (because, really, it would take longer than I care to spend researching it), I’m pretty sure Facebook has changed many lives—again, both for better and for worse. Continue reading

Daylight Saving Waste of Time

This last weekend, we observed the “spring forward” part of Daylight Saving Time. And it occurred to me that this is a waste of time, and causes more trouble than it’s worth. Now, I’m all for making better use of daylight. But consider the following:

  • Daylight Saving Time this year runs from March 13 to November 6. That’s almost 8 months. We spend nearly twice as much time under DST as we do under “standard” time. There’s something intrinsically wrong with this.
  • Twice a year, everyone has to go through all the clocks in their house and reset them. They have to adjust their internal body clocks.
  • Systems all over the world must keep up to date with the rules, when they take effect, and if they change. Not following the rules precisely can have dire consequences.

Continue reading

American English is Greener

Consider the following words: colour, flavour, honour, neighbour, rumour, labour, humour.

Those are all British spellings of the words Americans spell color, flavor, honor, neighbor, rumor, labor, humor. Each of them has an extra ‘u’. Whenever an American uses one of these words, or a whole host of others that fit the category, he takes a little less time to write it or type it, and takes up a little less room on the page. Continue reading